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Words That Motivate and Influence

Words That Motivate and Influence

Sales Maven, Nikki Rausch, Sales Tip

Do you have trigger words? Words that when you hear them pique your interest or maybe even stop you in your tracks because you’ve got to know more?

Most of us have a few trigger words. Of course one of the biggest challenges is knowing what are the “right” words to use with a prospect/client to move them into action.

It’s not really something you can ask someone, “What words should I use to earn your business?” And yet, believe it or not, when you know how to pay attention and pick up on the types of words someone’s using it’s a huge clue. I like to think of these as big flashing neon signs saying, “This is how to motivate and influence me.”

So, are you willing to start paying attention to the clues? One of the easiest ways to start to pick up on a prospect/client’s preferred types of words is to pay attention to the language they use when answering your questions.

For instance, when you ask a client, “What’s important to you when choosing …(insert your product/service here)?”

Their language will clearly depict their preferred style, and it will show up 1 of 3 ways:

  1. They focus on what they want to happen – towards language.
  2. They focus on what they don’t want to happen – away from language.
  3. They focus on a mix of what they want and what they don’t want – a mix of toward & away from language.

This is a huge clue as to what type of language they tend to feel most comfortable with and may be influenced by. Please note, one style is not better than another, this is information to be gathered to have a more effective conversation with a prospect/client.

Here’s an example of a possible conversation I might have with a new prospect. I generally ask prospects, “What’s important to you right now concerning your selling skills?”

  1. Towards Language: The person might say, “I want to feel more confident and know what to say when talking about my products/services.” (The focus is on what they do want to have happen.)
  2. Away-From Language: The person might say, “I struggle with the idea of asking people for money and I don’t want to come off as being salesy.” (The focus is on what they don’t want to have happen.)
  3. The Mix: The person might say, “I want to feel confident when asking for business and I don’t want to come off as being salesy.” (The focus is a mix on what they do want and also on what they don’t want.)

Next, by picking up these types of clues, you’ll have a better understanding of how to deliver a proposal back to the client.

Here’s an example what could be said when delivering back a proposal to work together:

  1. “The outcome of us working together will be to give you a renewed sense of confidence and learning key phrases to use in sales conversations.” (The focus in on what they will have as a result of us working together. – toward language)
  2. “After working together, you’ll no longer have to worry about the money conversations or hold yourself back from inviting people to work with you for fear of coming across salesy.” (The focus is on what they don’t want to have happen. – away-from language)
  3. “As a result of us working together, your confidence will grow as you hone your selling skills and you’ll no longer have to spend time second guessing yourself as coming across the wrong way in sales conversations.” (The focus is on getting them a little of what they want and saving them from having what they don’t want. – a mix of towards & away-from language)

Once you have an understanding of your prospect/client’s preferred language, you’ll be better able to deliver information in a way they are more open to receiving it.

Wishing you continued success this week.

Agree? Disagree? Have additional comments or thoughts on this article? Please share.

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