Satisfying Curiosity

Where would you rate yourself on a scale of 1 to 10 on your level of curiosity (1 being “not curious by nature,” 10 being “I gotta know more!”)?

Year’s ago, I learned a communication technique that involved using the phrase, “I’m curious.” After trying out the technique and saying, “I’m curious,…” I realized, I’m very curious by nature. Overall on a scale of 1 to 10, I’m about a 9.5.

“Satisfaction of one’s curiosity is one of the greatest sources of happiness in life.” ~ Dr. Linus Pauling

Since I teach my clients about curiosity, how to create it and what to say when you’ve piqued someone’s, this week’s Savvy Selling Tip is Create Curiosity When Responding To QuestionsAnswer questions in a way that leaves them wanting to know more.

Savvy Sales Tip - Create Curiosity

Here are 2 examples of how this works:

Example 1: Let’s say I sell makeup (could be any product, insert your product here and see how this might fit).

I’m meeting a new friend for lunch. When we get together, the first thing she asks me is, “How’s your week going.”

Standard response: “It’s been good.  How’s your week going?”

Curiosity creating response: “My week’s been all about mascara.” 

What do you think she might say next?  Maybe something like, “What does that mean your week’s been all about mascara?”

Now I have a tiny window (permission) to talk about my business. My response, “We just launched a brand new mascara women are going crazy for, it’s my new favorite product, and that’s all any of my clients want to talk about right now.”

Now, if my new friend is curious about this new mascara, she’ll ask.  If she changes the subject, chances are she’s not interested to know more.  I’m happy spending time building rapport and strengthening our relationship.

Example 2: Let’s say my service is teaching people skills to increase their sales/business (oh, yeah, that’s what I actually do).  BTW, this example is from a phone conversation I had a few days ago.

A woman I met a month ago at a networking event called me out of the blue.  She said she’s new to the area and looking to connect with people.  She asked me how long I’ve been a part of the group.

Here’s my response:

“I’ve been a part of the group for less than a year. I got involved with the group because a chapter opened up in my area.  I’ve stayed involved with the group because I’ve met some amazing people and I’ve been asked to speak at four of the chapters in the next few months.”

Can you guess what she asked next?

She wanted to know the topic I’ll be speaking on.

Now I could have answered her question by saying, “I’ve been a member since September.”  Of course, that answer doesn’t do anything to create curiosity.  By taking the question and expanding on it just a little bit, I’ve opened the door to see if she might be interested to know more about my business.

She very well could have said, “That’s nice. I’ve just joined in February.”

If that had been the case, the conversation would have gone in a completely different direction.  Which, by the way, would have been ok too.

Now it’s your turn.  Think about how you answer simple questions and how you can add a little bit more to your response to create curiosity.

Your feedback, questions, and comments are always welcome.  Please consider leaving one now if you like.